Last edited by Bragis
Saturday, May 9, 2020 | History

2 edition of Bristol and the slave trade found in the catalog.

Bristol and the slave trade

C. M. MacInnes

Bristol and the slave trade

by C. M. MacInnes

  • 341 Want to read
  • 7 Currently reading

Published by Bristol Branch of the Historical Association, The University in Bristol .
Written in English

    Subjects:
  • Slave trade -- England -- Bristol.

  • Edition Notes

    Statementby C.M. MacInnes.
    SeriesLocal history pamphlets -- 7., Local history pamphlets (Historical Association (Great Britain). Bristol Branch) : -- no. 7.
    The Physical Object
    Pagination19 p.
    Number of Pages19
    ID Numbers
    Open LibraryOL16600686M

    A Respectable Trade, the story of a series of unlikely events set in Bristol toward the end of the 18th Century, follows this Gregory formula and solidly delivers. Mehuru is a priest in the African kingdom of Yoruba and is on a quest to save his country from the ravages of slavery when he is beset upon and captured by white slavers from England/5().   Bristol and the slave trade This week we tackled a more difficult subject for our walk in the past walk – the Bristol slave trade. It is an uncomfortable but undeniable fact that much of Bristol’s prosperity came from the slave trade.

    The pamphlets cim be obtained from most Bristol book llers or direct from Mr. Peter --Harris, 74 Bell Barn Lane, Stoke Bishop, Bristol 9. It would be of great help if as many people as possible would place standing orders for future productions. BRISTOL AND THE SLAVE TRADE by c. M. MACINNES About the beginning of May Captain Thomas Wyndham of. Bristol became a city in and trade across the Atlantic developed. The city was captured by Royalist troops and then recaptured for Parliament during the English Civil War. During the 17th and 18th centuries the transatlantic slave trade and the Industrial Revolution brought further prosperity.

    James deWolf (), known in local history and folklore as Captain Jim, was the most successful of all Rhode Islanders engaged in the slave trade and in privateering. He was one of fifteen children born to Marc Anthony deWolf () and Abigail Potter. According to deWolf descendant, George Howe's excellent book. page 1 - bristol, africa and the eighteenth-century slave trade to america vol. 4 the final years, Appears in 3 books from Page xxxvi - Marshall acknowledges that the 'last years of the slave trade' were 'largely a period which displayed the indifference of the much lessened mercantile and shipping interests of the.


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Bristol and the slave trade by C. M. MacInnes Download PDF EPUB FB2

Bristol is a city in the South West of England, on the River Avon which flows into the Severn e of Bristol’s position on the River Avon, it has been an important location for marine trade for centuries.

The city's involvement with the slave trade peaked between andwhen it became the leading slaving port. If your view of Philippa Gregory is of an English historical novelist with a romantic slant, that is a fair description.

She has won the "Romantic Novel of the Year Award" among others. But with A Respectable Trade, published inshe was aiming for something a little is an historical novel about the slave trade in England, and set in 18th century Bristol/5.

Buy Slavery Obscured: The Social History of the Slave Trade in Bristol New edition by Dresser, Madge (ISBN: ) from Amazon's Book Store.

Everyday low prices and free delivery on Author: Madge Dresser. Bristol’s official involvement in the transatlantic slave trade started in when the London-based Royal African Company’s monopoly on the trade was ended. It’s worth noting that one member of the Royal African Company was the merchant Edward Colston, an.

Bristol, the slave trade and a reckoning with the past The battle over the statue of Edward Colston reflects deeper divisions in the city Share on Twitter (opens new window)Author: Judith Evans. COVID Resources.

Reliable information about the coronavirus (COVID) is available from the World Health Organization (current situation, international travel).Numerous and frequently-updated resource results are available from this ’s WebJunction has pulled together information and resources to assist library staff as they consider how to handle coronavirus.

Buy Satan's Kingdom: Bristol and the Transatlantic Slave Trade First Edition by Jones, Pip (ISBN: ) from Amazon's Book Store. 5/5(1). A short film explaining Bristol's involvement with the slave trade.

“Bristol was a minor port in the trade.” MYTH. Bristol played a major part in the transatlantic slave trade, with Bristol merchants financing over slaving voyages between and These ships carried overenslaved Africans from Africa to slave labour in the Americas.

On his return to England, he became a Methodist, converted to the religion by John Wesley, a Bristol preacher. Shortly after his death, his book The Life and Dealings of God with Silas Told was published in by his Methodist friends; to spread the story of his conversion to the religion and to show the cruelties of the slave trade, which.

The sugar was transported back to Bristol and then processed in the city. Anyone who bought sugar (or tea) at the time was implicated in the trade. Bristol was a rich city, and the slave trade made it even wealthier. The interlinked sugar, glass and slave trades brought Bristol work. Bristol, Africa and the Eighteenth Century Slave Trade to America, Vol 1: The Years of Expansion [pdf 13 MB] Only to libraries.

David Richardson. Bristol, Africa and the Eighteenth-Century Slave Trade to America, Vol 2: The Years of Ascendancy, [pdf 12 MB] £5 + postage. Georges Lamione. A main point of the book is that many people were involved in the slave trade, and that a huge portion of Rhode Islanders benefited from it (by selling to the traders, etc.).

The evil of importing slaves is thoroughly explored as the DeWolf descendants journey to Africa and visit the slave dungeons/5(55). The legacy of the slave trade is evident in the various buildings and institutions in Bristol that were born out of the wealth generated from the trade in slaves and products based on slave labour.

In this regard, Councillor Simon Cook, Bristol’s assistant mayor aptly sums up the relevance of Cranfield Becher’s year old log book as “a.

With Ralph Brown, Richard Briers, Grahame Fox, Jenny Agutter. The devastating consequences of the slave trade in 18th century Bristol are explored through the powerful but impossible attraction of well-born Frances and her Yoruban slave, Mehuru.

Bristol in is booming, from its stinking docks to its elegant new houses. Josiah Cole (Warren Clarke), a small dockside trader, is /10(1). And, as the Old Vic welcomes back audiences, its acclaimed artistic director, Tom Morris, will also be facing up to the theatre’s links with the slave trade that once made Bristol rich.

Legacies of the Slave Trade: The port of Bristol From the late s to the midth Century, Bristol’s main income was related to seaborne trade, and. For more than years, Bristol was a key port in the triangular slave trade. Arms, alcohol and textiles were shipped from the city to the west.

The devastating consequences of the slave trade in 18th century Bristol are explored through the powerful but impossible attraction of well-born Frances and her Yoruban slave, Mehuru.

Bristol in is booming, from its stinking docks to its elegant new houses. As Bristol grew wealthy on the back of the slave trade, many of its prominent residents took a stand in favour of abolition - including poets and religious figures. The extent of Bristol's involvement in the slave trade resonates in practically every civil and religious city landmark: from Merchants Wharf to the Redcliffe Caves, where slaves are said to have.3.

A brief historiography of the Bristol slave trade. Three types of historians have addressed the city's slaving past and I shall characterise them as the antiquarian chroniclers, the political narrators, and the economic greatest of the first group was the late Victorian John Latimer whose Annals of Bristol pulled no punches about either the popularity of the slave trade in.Open Library is an open, editable library catalog, building towards a web page for every book ever published.

Bristol and the slave trade by C. M. MacInnes,Bristol Branch of the Historical Association, The University edition, in EnglishCited by: 2.